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Landscape Tips


10 Tips to help you keep your landscape beautiful
November / December Issue


Tip #1
Its that time of year again, the time to begin planning for frost. Historically, the first freeze can occur as early as the November 15. Purchase and stage your frost protection materials so that if and when an event occurs, you are prepared. Use a fabric such as burlap or old sheets; never use plastic as it can cause plants to burn if they come into contact with the plastic. Once again, Use sheets, blankets or frost cloth (available at the nursery) as cover. No Plastic!  If frost warnings are predicted cover all tender plants and trees including: Bougainvillea, Hibiscus, Lantana, Fall annuals (geraniums petunias, etc), Natal plum, Plumbago, Pigmy dates, Ficus Trees, Orchids, Citrus  If you are unsure of the hardiness of any particular plant call the nursery.

Tip #2

Feed annual flowers fertilizer and dead head old blooms to prolong bloom cycle.



Tip #3

If you are looking to brighten you landscape for the winter plant one of these Phoenix Flowering plants in November: Black Dalea (Dalea frutescens), Blackfoot-daisy (Melampodium leucanthum), Red Sage (Salvia coccinea), Mistflower (Conoclinium greggii), San Marcos Hibiscus (Gossypium harknessii), Damianita (Chrysactinia mexicana), Dyssodia/Dogweed (Thymophylla pentachaeta), and Desert Broom (Baccharis sarothroides). Many aloe species will also begin to bloom.



Tip #4

Protect tender cactus by placing styrofoam cups on tips.



Tip #5

Your Winter plants should begin leafing out now: Boojum tree (Fouquieria columnaris) and Elephant Tree (Pachycormus discolor). Dudleyas, ice plants, succulent geraniums (Pelargonium spp.) and crassulaceous plants (Kalanchoe, Cotyledon, Echeveria) should be waking up, that is, if they made it through the summer! Other summer dormant plants waking from their summer slumber include Trixis (Trixis californica), Globe Mallow (Sphaeralcea ambigua), Brittlebush (Encelia farinosa), Senna purpusii, some Daleas (Dalea spp.) and Anderson’s Wolfberry (Lycium andersonii) and Penstemons (Penstemon spp.) will re-emerge if they died back to the roots during the summer months. Flowering plants this time of year can include: Black Dalea (Dalea frutescens), Blackfoot-daisy (Melampodium leucanthum), Red Sage (Salvia coccinea), Mistflower (Conoclinium greggii), San Marcos Hibiscus (Gossypium harknessii), Damianita (Chrysactinia mexicana), Dyssodia/Dogweed (Thymophylla pentachaeta), and Desert Broom (Baccharis sarothroides). Many aloe species will also begin to bloom.



Tip #6

Bring Holiday Poinsettias inside if it’s going to be cold out.


Tip #7

Keep your garden tools clean and sharp. Some plant diseases can be spread on tools. Hose soil off of garden tools before moving to another plant or area of your landscape. Sterilize pruning tools after each and every cut if there is any chance the plant is infected with a disease.


Tip #8

If you want to plant trees: Plant fruit and nut trees – use low chill varieties specially adapted to the low desert such as Bonanza Peach, Babcock Peach, Florida Prince Peach, Anna apple, Dorsett Apple, Grape varieties. You can also plant deciduous trees as well at this time of year: Elm, Chinese pistache, Crape myrtle, Flowering pear, Vitex, Purple leaf plum, Ash.




Tip #9

Begin harvesting citrus fruit – remember the longer fruit stays on the tree the sweeter it becomes. Do taste tests to determine sweetness so they are just the way you like them.  Tangerines, Navel Orange, Tangelos, Lemons, Grapefruit


Tip #10

Watch for fall color on Netleaf Hackberry (Celtis laevigata var. reticulata), Little Leaf Sumac (Rhus microphylla), Skunkbush Sumac (Rhus aromatica var. trilobata), Mexican-buckeye (Ungnadia speciosa), native Plumbago (Plumbago scandens), Arizona Rosemallow (Hibiscus biseptus) and Desert Rosemallow (Hibiscus coulteri). Some of your trees, shrubs, and herbaceous perennials will begin to lose their leaves for the season: Desert-willow (Chilopsis linearis), Elephant tree (Bursera spp.), Jatropha spp., Velvet-leaf Senna (Senna lindheimeriana) and Desert Senna (Senna covesii).
Aloe (Aloe ferox –Aloe dawei) & Blue  Euphorbia (Euphorbia rigida). One of the best early winter color combinations. Brilliant redorange flowers of Tree Aloe, a South African leaf succulent, that also attracts hummingbirds, in contrast to the outstanding citron-yellow flowers of Blue Euphorbia.


 
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